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      • A Letter to our Customers and Partners

        Lance Looper | 12/341/2017 | 05:30 PM

        Silicon Labs Announces Definitive Agreement to Acquire Z-Wave

        Silicon Labs has entered into a definitive agreement to acquire Sigma Designs and its Z-Wave business and technology. Silicon Labs and the Z-Wave team have a shared vision of a secure, interoperable connected home. Adding Z-Wave to Silicon Labs’ wireless technologies enhances our ability to give you choice of connectivity protocols for your application needs. Silicon Labs intends to work in collaboration with the Z-Wave Alliance to drive the road map and adoption of Z-Wave technology.

        Z-Wave is a popular, mesh networking technology for home automation and security, supplying some of the world’s largest ecosystems of smart home IoT products. There are more than 2,100 certified, interoperable Z-Wave devices available from a thriving alliance of more than 600 manufacturers. Z-Wave will extend our portfolio for wireless connectivity, which features Zigbee®, Thread, Bluetooth®, and proprietary protocols today.

        As a valued customer, we want to thank you for putting your trust in us to deliver quality products for the IoT. The acquisition of Z-Wave will further our mission of providing outstanding, secure and interoperable connectivity solutions for the connected home and beyond.  For more information, please refer to today’s release

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        Forward-Looking Statements

        This announcement contains forward-looking statements (including within the meaning of Section 21E of the United States Securities Exchange Act of 1934, as amended, and Section 27A of the United States Securities Act of 1933, as amended) concerning Silicon Labs (“Silicon Labs”) and its proposed acquisition (the “Acquisition”) of Sigma Designs (“Sigma Designs”) or the Z-Wave business and related matters. These statements include, but are not limited to, statements that address Silicon Labs’ expected future business and financial performance and statements about (i) the timing, completion and expected benefits of the Acquisition, (ii) plans, objectives and intentions with respect to future operations and products, (iii) competitive position and opportunities, (iv) the impact of the Acquisition on the market for Silicon Labs products, (vi) the impact of the Acquisition on non-GAAP EPS, (vi) other information relating to the Acquisition and (vii) other statements identified by words such as “will”, “expect”, “intends”, “believe”, “anticipate”, “estimate”, “should”, “intend”, “plan”, “potential”, “predict” “project”, “aim”, and similar words, phrases or expressions. These forward-looking statements are based on current expectations and beliefs of the management of Silicon Labs and Sigma Designs, as well as assumptions made by, and information currently available to, such management, current market trends and market conditions and involve risks and uncertainties, many of which are outside the companies’ and management’s control, and which may cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in forward-looking statements. Accordingly, you should not place undue reliance on such statements.

        Particular uncertainties that could materially affect future results include any risks associated with the Acquisition such as: (1) the risk that the conditions to the closing of the transaction are not satisfied, including the risk that required approvals from the stockholders of Sigma Designs for the transactions or regulatory approvals are not obtained; (2) litigation relating to the transaction; (3) uncertainties as to the timing of the consummation of the transaction and the ability of each party to consummate the transaction; (4) risks that the proposed transaction disrupts the current plans and operations of Sigma Designs and Silicon Labs; (5) the ability of Sigma Designs and Silicon Labs to retain and hire key personnel; (6) competitive responses to the proposed transaction; (7) unexpected costs, charges or expenses resulting from the transaction; (8) potential adverse reactions or changes to business relationships resulting from the announcement or completion of the transaction; (9) the ability to divest or wind down Sigma Designs’ Smart TV business; (10) the ability to divest Sigma Designs’ Media Connectivity business; (11) Sigma Designs’ ability to amend or terminate certain contracts; (12) Sigma Designs’ ability to maintain sufficient cash to satisfy the minimum cash condition; (13) Silicon Labs’ ability to achieve the growth prospects and synergies expected from the transaction, as well as delays, challenges and expenses associated with integrating Sigma Designs into Silicon Labs’ existing businesses and the indebtedness planned to be incurred in connection with the transaction; and (14) legislative, regulatory and economic developments.

        The foregoing review of important factors that could cause actual events to differ from expectations should not be construed as exhaustive and should be read in conjunction with Silicon Labs’ and Sigma Designs’ filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC”), which you may obtain for free at the SEC’s website at http://www.sec.gov, and which discuss additional important risk factors that may affect their respective businesses, results of operations and financial conditions. Silicon Labs and Sigma Designs undertake no intent or obligation to publicly update or revise any of these forward-looking statements, whether as a result of new information, future events or otherwise, except as required by law.

        Additional Information and Where to Find It

        Sigma Designs intends to file the applicable proxy statement(s) in connection with the Acquisition. Investors and security holders of Sigma Designs are urged to read such proxy statement(s) (including any amendments or supplements thereto) and any other relevant documents in connection with the Acquisition that Sigma Designs will file with the SEC upon such documents becoming available because they will contain important information about Sigma Designs and the Acquisition. Such materials filed by Sigma Designs with the SEC may be obtained free of charge at the SEC’s website (http://www.sec.gov) or at the Investor Relations page on Sigma Designs’ website at www.sigmadesigns.com or by writing to Sigma Designs’ Secretary at 47467 Fremont Blvd. Fremont, CA 94538 USA.

        Sigma Designs and its directors and executive officers may be deemed to be participants in the solicitation of proxies from Sigma Designs’ stockholders with respect to the Acquisition. Additional information about Sigma Designs’ directors and executive officers is set forth in Sigma Designs’ proxy statement on Schedule 14A filed with the SEC on July 17, 2017 and Annual Report on Forms 10-K and 10-K/A for the fiscal year ended January 28, 2017. Information regarding their direct or indirect interests in the Acquisition will be set forth in the proxy statement and other materials to be filed with SEC.

         

         

         

      • IoT Hero Snooz Moves Air to Lull People to Sleep

        Lance Looper | 12/339/2017 | 10:27 AM

        Silicon Labs recently had the chance to talk with sleep-enthusiast Eli Lazar, co-founder of Snooz, a start-up company that created a white noise sleep machine that strives to turn people’s bedrooms into a sleep haven. A Kickstarter and angel-funded innovation that has only been on the market since April, Eli gave us a behind the scenes glimpse of how the product came about and how he and his partner successfully brought the Snooz machine to market.

        How did you come up with the idea?

        I used a fan to sleep in college and would pack a fan in my suitcase when I traveled to ensure I got a good night’s rest. When I was in college studying mechanical engineering, I started noticing that just about everybody I knew would sleep with a fan pointed at the wall, because they wanted the sound, without the cold air blowing on them. Later on, I also found a study from the University of Michigan that showed about half of their student population used sound to help them sleep. Fans are made to drive a lot of air and do it quietly, but we realized people were trying to use them in the opposite way and extract the noise from them and have no air. So we thought maybe we should make a special fan for sleeping. We found one other company that had made a white noise machine – a real fan, but it started in 1960 and the design hadn’t changed much since. I know there are apps and electronics on the market that mimicked the sound of moving air, but they weren’t real fans.

        So how did you go about to make that happen?

        The first thing we did was a lot of tinkering – experiential engineering. How do you make a “shh” sound?  I didn’t know. There are no books on that. So I literally ordered 10 CPU desktop computer fans. I ordered a box of CD spindles. We just started playing around with stuff. We ended up buying a cheap 3D printer and printed out a bunch of different designs. We eventually got to the point where people actually wanted to sleep with it, which took a full year of experimenting.

        Then we started the painful process of fundraising. We did a Kickstarter campaign to test the market and raised a half million dollars in 49 days. We also attended angel pitch events and eventually got to an investor who had his own VC firm. He told us we were too small for the firm, but I gave him a fan prototype and his wife ended up loving it. He still told us we were still not well-suited for his firm, but he wrote us a personal check.

        The next phase was production. Probably the hardest thing to figure out was the fabric, which seems like it would be the easiest thing. But there are only a niche group of people that understand fabric, and when you have a metal surface, it becomes an even smaller group.

        Eventually we got to a place where we produced the first batch of 10,000 units and we shipped 7,000 on Kickstarter and the rest sold on Amazon or our website. We’re still very much trying to figure out how to bring costs down and those sorts of things. We don’t take a salary - we haven’t taken one penny since we started.

        What was the most surprising thing that you have learned so far?

        Everything moves slowly, it’s really true. Nobody is in a hurry except you. You go to an investor, and months will go by before you hear from them. Even now, we’ll produce something, and it’ll be 20 weeks before we see the product. It has taught me a lot about patience. But the most surprising thing is you kind of lay out how people are going to see the product, but then it’s totally different. For example, you might write out instructions for the device, but people will interpret what you say a lot differently. The other thing I learned is you have to have a thick skin. I mean, you put a lot of time into the product and you end up being very close to it, and people can be brutal. The vast majority of our reviews are very positive, but you do get some people that pick one little thing on the product they don’t like, such as the power cord, something little, and those things can really tear into you if you let it. I never thought I’d be as sensitive to customer feedback as I am.

        Do you have any favorite stories from users?

        We get quite a few emails from people that would really blow you away. People will say they’ve had bad nightmares their entire life, but since using Snooz, they sleep perfectly. We get a lot of people telling us they haven’t been able to sleep for long periods of time or they had to take medication to sleep and now they sleep fine.

        Sleep is everything to people, if you can’t have it, you’re messed up.

        Yes, and I think it’s an issue getting more attention. Last year at CES was the first time the conference included an entire section of devices devoted to sleep.

        What were some of your design challenges with this product?

        We had pretty tight constraints for what we wanted. We brought prototypes to the design firm and laid out our guidelines. They came up with 8 or 9 designs and we were really drawn to the fabric design because it allows sound to go through it unobstructed. We liked the idea of combining fabric and electronics.

        Our original vision was the device would be a beautiful product that sits in your room and you don’t interact with it – you don’t even have to touch it. That’s why we decided to use the Bluetooth chip from Silicon Labs because it gave us the ability to program its schedule or turn on remotely.

        The fabric was a real challenge. They make the fabric wraps automated, but there’s still some manual work to sew the seams. We did a lot to make sure the fabric isn’t toxic, as well.

        Creating the right packaging was another challenge. One thing a design professional asked us right when we were starting was, “Why do people buy products?” And we said for functionality. And he said, “No, no, people don’t buy products for function – they buy them for the emotional connection.” So just having the right package feel, the look to the box – was important to us.

        What product did you use from Silicon Labs?

        Initially, we used the BLE113, but then we switched recently to the new BGM113. I was already familiar with Silicon Labs, but the decision stemmed from our connection with a design firm in Chicago. The firm highly recommended Silicon Labs products and they had a lot of experience with your company and said the technology always pretty much works – it’s really rock solid. They explained that you can always find other dirt cheap chips out there, but you’re going to have all kinds of issues.

        Where do you see IoT going in the next 5-8 years?

        We have definitely encountered two crowds that we sell to. One group loves the app, loves the Bluetooth and loves everything connected. But then the other group is like, I don’t want any of that – I want it old-school simple. We keep trying to figure out the right balance, where we make things connected but not so connected that they become a nuisance to people. My impression is it’s probably going to be a fight about what things should be connected and what shouldn’t be.

        One of the things about Kickstarter is we had 6,000 backers – it’s like having 6,000 bosses. People were telling us to add this and add that, but we didn’t want it to be this super connected device. I don’t think the bedroom should have a ton of connected devices – it should be a place where it’s free of that. I hope IoT’s pace doesn’t go so fast that people try to connect everything, because then people will learn to hate it. But it can be useful if it goes at the right pace, because with some things it just makes sense.

        I don’t like when things get too complicated. I’d rather the whole company flop and stick to the vision that we are going to do what’s right for people, not the company. Because I know if we start adding all kinds of new features, the product might sell more, but I don’t think people will sleep better because of it and it’ll cause them more frustration. My partner and I really just want to do what will help people sleep better. 

         

         

         

      • IoT Gift Guide: For Those Beyond the Early-Adopter

        Lance Looper | 12/335/2017 | 05:08 PM

        2017 was a big year for the Internet of Things (IoT), with more and more devices bringing new levels of usefulness thanks to the power of connectivity. With the holidays quickly approaching, it’s time to start shopping for the perfect gifts for your loved ones. This year you can find more IoT gifts for just about everyone on your list, from teens to grandma. Gifting connected devices can make people’s lives more efficient, safe, healthy and fun. Instead of sticking to people’s wish lists, give them something they can’t live without, but they don’t even know it yet.

        We’ve taken the guess work out of holiday shopping by curating our favorite Silicon Labs-powered products we have featured over the past year in our IoT Hero blog. Below are some popular giftable IoT devices, ranging from smart lighting to high-fashion wearables to personal transportation.

         

        Electric Skateboard

        For those in your family seeking alternative transportation options, look no further than the Inboard M1Electric Skateboard. Powered by a Silicon Labs BLE113 Bluetooth module in both the board and the remote control, the M1 skateboard keeps rider’s feet on the board while mapping streets, detecting road conditions, and keeping the rider in perpetual motion. 

        The Inboard M1 blends sharp industrial design and functional wireless technology. 

         

        Beautifying Decor

        After creating the most energy-efficient lightbulb on the market, Nanoleaf started merging art with light and ended up creating unprecedented lighting systems for the home. Powered by Zigbee SoCs and a communications stack from Silicon Labs, Nanoleaf Aurora lighting systems allow people to customize their lights entirely based on their color, mood and timing preferences. The system was largely inspired by the idea of recreating natural light, so people could experience the same warm, soothing qualities indoors as well—especially during winter when there’s less sunlight hours.

        The Aurora lighting system from Nanoleaf offers smart, customizable lighting.

         

        The Pulse integrates speakers and lighting.

        Another one of our customers, Sengled, has taken lighting to a new dimension by adding a multi-channel music speaker within an actual lightbulb. The Pulse lighting system is a synchronous multi-channel speaker light and the world's first one that can play with a mobile phone. Pulse, powered by a Silicon Labs Zigbee solution, can support up to eight lights simultaneously while playing music and can adjust each light to the sound and volume for each speaker, making it the perfect gift for people in your life looking for gadgets to enhance the home entertainment experience.

         

        Ice Fishing Gear

        Granted, ice fishing is a highly regional sport, but for those anglers in your life living near ice, how about a device that allows them to stay warm indoors while they wait to get a fish on the line? Deep Freeze Fishing sells Blue Tipz fishing alerts that provide an alert system for fishing lines, freeing the angler to monitor catches from afar. The product uses the Bluegiga BLE121LR Bluetooth module from Silicon Labs to transmit a fish strike from the flag on the line to the phone of the fisher, giving them the freedom to stay indoors while they fish.

         

        Safety Accessories

        It’s easy to find friends and family among your loved ones who A) like jewelry, and/or B) wouldn’t mind an extra safety net if they run into danger. Two Silicon Labs customers, Wisewear and Revolar, have tapped into the safety wearables trend after creating modern connected IoT jewelry to keep people safe.

        Wisewear built a wellness wearable product in the form of an exquisite gold or silver bracelet or ring, serving as a panic button, fitness tracker and notification device. The founder of Wisewear created the jewelry solution after his grandfather fell down the stairs at home and no one was there to help him. Wisewear is one the first jewelry products on the market to integrate sensors and electronics with metal jewelry, tapping the Silicon Labs Wonder Gecko 32-bit MCU to make the fusion of fashion and technology successful.

        Wisewear brings the benefits of connectivity to superbly designed jewelry.

         

        Another safety device worth considering for loved ones is Revolar’s Instant Personal Safety device, which hooks onto your clothing, key chain, handbag, etc. and connects to your phone via Bluetooth. If the carrier ever feels threatened or in danger, all the user has to do is press an indiscreet button to send one of three alert levels to their pre-selected loved ones, including a “hey, I’m home or I’m safe” alert, a yellow alert for uncomfortable situations, and a third alert for serious emergencies. 

        Revolar's personal safety devices keep users safe simply, and discreetly.

         

        Enjoy the holiday season, and happy shopping!

         

         

         

         

         

      • Timing 101: The Case of the Split Termination

        Lance Looper | 11/333/2017 | 02:48 PM

        Welcome to another edition of the Timing 101 blog from Silicon Labs' Kevin Smith.

        As I write this post it is late November. Here in the US we celebrate Thanksgiving Day on the fourth Thursday of November each year. It is customary to celebrate with friends and family and to give thanks for ones blessings in general and over the past year.

        From a technical perspective, one of the things I am thankful for are the previous generations of engineers that laid the groundwork for our industry, and that trained, mentored, or otherwise gave opportunities to the current generation of engineers. Which reminds me of a particular topic...

        The Split Termination

        This month I would like to expand a little on a subject I first introduced in the Timing Knowledge Base article Terminating Differential Transmission Lines to Minimize CM Noise. That article described a relatively simple but very practical differential circuit termination suggested to me by an experienced EMI engineer many years ago. Think of it as a tip similar to the sort of thing found in QST’s old monthly “Hints & Kinks” column, now known as "Hints & Hacks."

        I had never run across it in school and had never seen it in print but I have since used it ubiquitously. This is the case of the split termination and is the subject of this month’s column. The idea in a nutshell is expressed in the figure below. The arrow is to suggest we should generally move from the left hand “textbook” termination to the right hand more practical termination.

         

        Many output clock formats such as CML, LVDS, and LVPECL are routed and terminated differentially. This is usually illustrated as a pair of single-ended nominal uncoupled 50 Ω transmission lines (one for each polarity) terminating in to an ideal 100 Ω resistor at the far end or receiver end of the circuit. This is depicted on the left hand side as the “Textbook” 100 Ω Differential Termination.

        However, consider what happens when driving both input transmission lines simultaneously with the same voltage signal as can happen with noise. This is the Common Mode (CM) case as opposed to the usual Differential Mode (DM) case. Since the voltage is the same on both sides of the 100 Ω termination resistor, there is no current flow. Therefore, the CM signal doesn’t “see” the termination resistor at all and the high impedance receiver will look like an open. (The CM transmission line impedance in this example is 50 Ω // 50 Ω = 25 Ω.) So from a CM perspective we have a “noisy” signal generator driving a 25 Ω transmission line in to an open which means CM noise will be reflected, likely many times.

        CM noise can arise from power supplies and crosstalk impacting both transmission lines similarly. Further, even if you don’t have a noisy board, CM noise can also arise from imbalanced transmission lines or skew which is very common, if you will pardon the pun.

        How could we terminate both DM and CM? The practical split termination on the right is a T-network attempt to do this requiring only 2 more components and AC-coupled access to GND. Note that this particular termination does not increase the DC loading on the driver.

        There are other approaches but these may require more components, more DC current draw, more matching, or possibly a bias voltage. (Incidentally, this differential split termination is not to be confused with LVPECL pullup and pull-down terminations which occasionally are referred to as “split” terminations also.)

        The split termination explicitly splits the load termination and enforces a practical AC GND at the center-tap. Now CM current will flow and the CM signal will “see” a matching impedance, over the frequencies of interest. The 49.9 Ω selection is the closest 1% value to nominal 50 Ω. By contrast, a signal driven differentially will not “see” the center-tap capacitor to GND.

        Application Details

        Intuition suggests correctly that the center-tap capacitor enforces the CM voltage to see a low impedance to GND. The value 0.1 μF is a good large value and can be adjusted if necessary. There are a couple of more quantitative approaches to sizing the capacitor.

        (1) Size the capacitor so as to hold the charge steady during a maximum expected Δt skew (reference).

        (2) Consider the termination as a CM noise low pass filter with the corner frequency calculated as follows:

        For example, if R = nominal 50 Ω and C = 0.1 μF then the corner frequency is ≈ 64 kHz which should generally be plenty low enough.

        A similar version of this termination is used in CAN (Controller Area Network) applications for this purpose, supplying a special SPLIT CM voltage bias instead of GND. For an example of this, see NXP Semiconductors' AN10211, TJA104 High-Speed CAN Transceiver

        As noted in the original KB article, many SOCs and FPGAs support internal differential terminations. However, they usually do not support CM termination or give pin access to support a center-tap. (The CAN transceiver example cited above is an exception.) Therefore, if CM noise is an issue, it is best to disable the internal termination if possible, and use a higher performance external differential split termination instead.

        Conclusion

        This month I’ve provided a little more insight in to the differential split termination first described in a KB article. In this Thanksgiving season, I am grateful for these and other circuit tips I have received over the years.

        This submission will be posted too late to beat the holiday so a belated Happy Thanksgiving to you all! I hope you have enjoyed this Timing101 article. As always, if you have topic suggestions, or there are questions you would like answered, appropriate for this blog, please send them to kevin.smith@silabs.com with the words Timing 101 in the subject line. I will give them consideration and see if I can fit them in.

        Thanks for reading. Keep calm and clock on.

        Cheers,

        Kevin

      • New Flex Gecko Wireless Solution Takes Low Power to New Extremes

        Lance Looper | 11/319/2017 | 04:47 PM

        We have some great news for customers looking to differentiate their low-power and long-range wireless devices using our proprietary wireless EFR32 Flex Gecko  family. Silicon Labs just released another proprietary wireless solution – the new Flex Gecko EFR32FG14, which achieves significant low power gains and offers many of the same peripheral capabilities found in our previous Flex Gecko solutions.

        The EFR32FG14 expands on the success of the EFR32FG1 products by offering remarkable low-power benefits with up to 48 percent sleep current reduction, and new flexibility to connect to more peripherals, such as VDAC and OpAmp support. The new solution maintains RF performance enhancements from previous solutions while offering similar Flash and RAM memory options and improved security features.

        As always, our first priority during our design process is to listen to what our customers need to say and strive to make improvements based on their feedback. This new Flex Gecko solution is no different, and our customers will immediately see the low-power and performance benefits. New improvements to the EFR32FG14 include enhanced 2.4 GHz RF performance, deep sleep data processing, improved security with a new true random number generator security management unit, and boosted Sub-GHz performance with improved 2/4 (G) FSK sensitivity.

        To simplify product spec comparisons, we specified the test conditions of our Flex Gecko products in our documentation materials as clearly as possible, with minimum and maximum values for key parameters, and also provided RAIL-based application code examples using the FM modes.

        With more than 250 million Silicon Labs proprietary wireless ICs shipped to date, the new Flex Gecko solution furthers our expertise and footprint in the proprietary wireless market. The wireless Flex Gecko portfolio supports sub-GHz and 2.4 GHz designs with a single chip, simplifying board development, inventory management, and time to market for our customers. Our new solution along with all of our Flex Gecko devices are footprint compatible with the Blue Gecko and Mighty Gecko devices, allowing customers to add multi-protocol support into their designs later with minimal changes. Ultimately, Flex Gecko provides a seamless migration path to multi-protocol applications requiring the addition of BLE, Zigbee or Thread.

        The EFR32FG14 product will be used for a wide variety of low-power and long-range communications devices, such as smart meters, electronic shelf tables, home automation, security systems, lighting controls, medical emergency devices, and agricultural applications.

        As the IoT market continues to explode, the popularity of proprietary wireless solutions increasingly grows as designers look to optimize the performance and cost of their products without being constrained by industry standard or alliance requirements. From a market standpoint, we understand how critical it is for our designers to design a highly optimized proprietary network, which can often make a product stand out from competing products with unique performance and feature differentiators.

        Despite the popularity of proprietary wireless solutions – building out the designs can sometimes be a challenge for designers as it requires a deep understanding of all aspects from the physical layer and regulatory requirements to the network layer and application layer. Our Simplicity Studio development software simplifies this process and helps Flex Gecko customers maximize their hardware while creating unique device innovations. Go here to learn more about our supporting software development kits.

      • Employee Spotlight – Pranav Kaundinya

        Lance Looper | 11/318/2017 | 03:24 PM

        Pranav Kaundinya has been a member of the Power and Isolation – Design team since September 2015. In his role as Design Engineer he’s involved in the entire pipeline of chip design, starting from NPI (new product introduction) to supporting applications and testing products after a launch.

        Kaundinya was born in India, but lived in New York for several years before returning to India for middle and high school. He attended MIT in Boston before interning at Silicon Labs in the summer of 2014. As an NCG (new college graduate), Kaundinya has continually demonstrated his organizational and technical skills. Principal Design Engineer, Alan Westick said of Kaundinya, “[He] has been productive on his own assignments, striking the right balance between using proven design approaches where possible while coming up with creative solutions where innovation is needed to meet the product requirements.”

        Kaundinya’s favorite thing about working at Silicon Labs is the people. He thinks Silicon Labs employees are “talented and friendly people to work with and learn from.” He said, “Even though we’re no longer a startup, we’re still a small company and run like a startup in many ways (e.g. Tyson comes to our happy hours).”

        When asked where he’d go if he could travel anywhere in the world, Kaundinya said he’d go hiking in Bhutan, “the happiest place in the world.” He added, “I think it would be a unique experience to visit one of the last places in the world that is relatively untouched by technology and globalization (TVs were banned in Bhutan until the early 2000s). It’s also really hard to visit.”

        Always up for a challenge – we like your style! We’re proud to have you on the Silicon Labs team. Keep up the great work!

         

      • Webinar: Expanding Device Capability with Multiprotocol Connectivity

        LeighPankonien | 11/312/2017 | 05:05 PM

        Title: Webinar: Expanding Device Capability with Multiprotocol Connectivity

        Date: December 13 & 14, 2017

        Duration: 1 hour

        Multiprotocol connectivity makes it easier to deliver proximity-based mobile experiences with Bluetooth beacons through connected lights and building automation systems. Consumers also gain the ability to commission, control, and monitor IoT devices operating in Zigbee® mesh networks directly over Bluetooth® with smartphone apps. Smartphone control of connected devices is achieved through a single multiprotocol SoC or module supporting Bluetooth with low energy functionality and Zigbee, eliminating the need for gateways or border routers to send or receive messages to the cloud. 

        In this webinar, we explore how multiprotocol wireless technology advances IoT connectivity for next generation applications that are easier to deploy, use, and update.

        Join our hour-long webinar and get your questions answered during our Live Q&A session at the end.

         

         

      • Introducing Dynamic Multiprotocol Software for Wireless Gecko SoCs

        Lance Looper | 11/310/2017 | 12:33 PM

        Today we’ve introduced multiprotocol wireless software to drive advanced functionality for next-gen IoT applications by making it possible to unlock key benefits of both the Zigbee and Bluetooth low energy protocols. One of the exciting things about this multiprotocol solution is that it makes additional functionality possible for IoT devices without the complexity and cost that comes with a two-chip architecture, reducing cost and size by up to 40 percent.

        Users can commission, update, control, and monitor Zigbee mesh networks over Bluetooth with smartphone apps and the software makes it easier to deploy indoor location-based services by extending Zigbee-based lighting systems with Bluetooth beacons.

        Smart lighting is one application that benefits because consumers can use their smartphone to simplify device setup. Added to this, commercial Zigbee systems can be updated via a Bluetooth smartphone or tablet. IoT products inside the home can connect to popular automation platforms and that support Zigbee while at the same time supporting connectivity to smartphones for simple setup, control, and monitoring. Smart Buildings will also be able to get in on the action. Building automation systems based on Zigbee can be extended, making it possible for employees to interact using Bluetooth enabled devices.

        For lighting in particular, multiprotocol connectivity is an area that is making it possible for manufacturers to distinguish themselves. Multiprotocol functionality makes it possible to simultaneously combine protocols like Zigbee with Bluetooth® on a single chip through intelligent time-slicing. Used together, a lamp can communicate with established Zigbee mesh-enabled devices while providing Bluetooth beaconing and smartphone-enabled light control. Hardware supporting multiprotocol and developer tool features to consider when selecting a platform for designing control and lighting systems are also examined. 

        Check out the whitepaper, “Enhancing Smart Lighting with 802.15.4 Mesh, Bluetooth, and Multiprotocol Connectivity.”

        Our dynamic multiprotocol software is driven by powerful wireless protocol stacks and an advanced radio scheduler running on Micrium OS. The software development kit (SDK) is available in Simplicity Studio and includes a connected lighting demo supported on selected Wireless Gecko starter kits and mobile app reference designs.

         

         

         

         

      • Design a Multiprotocol Device in 3 Hours

        Siliconlabs | 11/306/2017 | 08:30 AM

         

        Title: Design a Multiprotocol Device in 3 Hours

        Date: Tuesday-Thursday, December 5-7, 2017

        Time: 12:00 PM Central Standard Time

        Duration: 3-day workshop, for 1 hour each day

        With Silicon Labs' software and hardware, you can design a single product that supports multiple wireless connectivity protocols. During our 3-day online workshop, we will spend an hour each day developing a Bluetooth and Proprietary multiprotocol project with the new Thunderboard Sense 2.  

        Day 1 we will briefly discuss Silicon Labs’ Bluetooth stack and introduce Simplicity Studio. We will walkthrough developing a Bluetooth project using the GATT editor in Simplicity Studio.  By the end of the lab, we will use our Blue Gecko mobile phone app to modify the Thunderboard Sense’s RGB LEDs using the device’s GATT characteristics.

        Day 2 we will discuss Silicon Labs’ Flex SDK which allows the developer to implement their own proprietary wireless networks. We will walkthrough a lab using the Flex SDK’s RAIL library to transmit data across a proprietary network.  By the end of the lab, our goal is to update the RBG LEDs of multiple Thunderboards across a proprietary network.

        Day 3 we will discuss the Gecko Bootloader of the EFR32 chipset and how it’s architecture allows us to switch application images and wireless stacks.  Our final lab will combine the previous Bluetooth and Proprietary projects using the gecko bootloader. By the end we will be able to set the RGB LED values of a Thunderboard via Bluetooth then reboot it into a proprietary network to update surrounding devices on the network.

        Note: At least two Thunderboard Sense 2s are recommended to test a network on Days 2 and 3. However you can still walk through the labs using a single board.

      • Silicon Labs Supports Women in Tech

        LeighPankonien | 10/303/2017 | 05:57 PM

        Silicon Labs CMO Michele Grieshaber takes a moment to review one of Silicon Labs' four core values.

        We hire, foster and empower great talent. 

        • We look for technical skill, creativity, and the potential to do great things. 
        • We value big-picture thinkers and cross-functional doers. 
        • We create an environment of trust and encourage open, two-way communication.

        At Silicon Labs we believe this great talent can come from anywhere and anyone. Therefore we support a diverse workforce, from gender to age to ethnicity to sexual orientation, and so on. We also support and believe in the importance of STEM initiatives around the globe. Venn diagram these and you’ll get Women in Tech. 

        Our Chief People Office, Lori Knowlton, elaborated on our support of women in tech in a recent article: “Women bring new ideas and perspectives to the table. And in doing so, they open the door to well-rounded thought processes that create better, more flexible products and higher performing teams. Successful teams employ a combination of left-brain and right-brain thinking. Companies who deeply understand and invest in the value of diverse, inclusive thinking are outperforming and outthinking their competition. By three times.” 

        Within the last couple of years a grassroots movement was started by a few women at Silicon Labs with the mission focused on support, inclusion and driving change. It started as a get-together by a small group within a specific department and has since expanded to include anyone who wants to participate within the organization. The Women @ SiLabs group is currently lead by Holly Ammerman, a Senior Product Marketing Engineer, and co-chaired by Renee Curfman, our Director of IT Infrastructure Services. One example of this group driving change is its work with the senior leadership team, and one-on-one with current and future women to make sure they’re growing and have all the opportunities awarded to them so they can help Silicon Labs get to where it needs to be.

        Renee Curfman shares her perspective: “We have this opportunity to really bring amazing innovation and change to this industry. I think we can get there faster and we can get there better if we do even more to open up that conversation and include more women. There’s always more work to be done to demonstrate your commitment to diversity and having different values and frames of mind at the table will propel us forward faster.”

        We believe it’s very important to amplify these voices and to engage in a conversation about gender and diversity. Hear the advice some of our employees give to women trying to break into the tech industry:

        While this video represents just a few of the gems these ladies shared, we’ll continue to share more of their powerful thoughts on our social media channels. We encourage you to follow along and join in the conversation. 

        Let’s continue the conversation: